Scripture Sunday: Job 10 thru 12

Listen here or subscribe in your favorite podcast app

We’re continuing through the book of Job, as he and his friends continue to wrestle with understanding what it means for a man to experience suffering in the face of the truth about God: He is good, just, and sovereign. Many in our world take the presence of suffering as proof that God does not exist, or that He is not good. But that answer is neither true nor satisfying, and as we continue through the text both here and in our Spurgeon Audio series we will see how God speaks to this difficult issue.

Do you struggle with this? You are not alone, and it’s not a bad struggle to face, especially now as we all face ongoing turmoil. Let us know how we can be praying for you.

Please consider supporting Kings Way Talk through our Patreon.

Subscribe to our new YouTube channel!

Spurgeon Audio: Satan Considering the Saints

Listen here or subscribe on your favorite podcast app

Put not your trust in anything beneath the stars; remember that “Change” is written on the fore-front of nature. Say not therefore, “My mountain standeth firm: it shall never be moved;” the glance of Jehovah’s eye can shake thy mountain into dust, the touch of his foot can make it like Sinai, to melt it like wax, and to be alttogether on a smoke. “Set your affection on things above, where Christ sitteth on the right hand of God, and let your heart and your treasure be where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, nor thieves break through and steal.”

Charles H. Spurgeon, sermon 623, “Satan Considering the Saints”

The weight on the hearts of believers everywhere is of a sort that I don’t know we’ve experienced in the lifetimes of any but a few currently living. We have become accustomed to individual struggles and sufferings, but it seems to me that few of us have a real concept for mass or cultural sufferings that is actually our own.

For Western Christians we have been used for a long time to having the sufferings we face be more limited in that way. Though our culture may regard us with a general side-eye of distrust, they don’t actively oppress or persecute us. Though they may say silly and ridiculous things about “hate” regarding our theology, they don’t turn away from hospitals with denominational names emblazoned across the front. And we have enjoyed, for the most part, a great deal of liberty to worship our Lord. Many have preached the gospel boldly and at the same time sought to encourage human flourishing by demonstrating that a culture that may disbelieve, yet still practices life in line with His commandments at least to some extent, succeeds and enjoys the benefits of His grace more than one that practices pagan unbelief as a matter of course.

Now we are face to face with what is, at the very least, a time of extreme discomfort and uncertainty, which threatens to grow into a time of greater disease, possibly followed by poverty, and a loss of many freedoms as well as lives. Like with Job, it seems to have come upon us rather suddenly. I know personally, I was spending the beginning of this year making plans for what I wanted this year to include, only to see so many of them dashed to pieces as businesses closed and all the ways we have been able to divert ourselves suddenly are shuttered.

Yet even though our whole culture is affected by this suffering en masse, each individual has their own particular story. I wanted to take this time, as we all walk through the frustrations and losses and heartaches that each of us finds ourselves assigned to in this time, to point to the story of Job and his dark night of the soul, as it were. I know my tendency when encountering hard times is to grit my teeth and just try to sit it out until it goes away. I am willing to bet that experience is true of a lot of people out there.

Job the Faithful Servant

The book of Job is one that I think is often misunderstood and misinterpreted. I would encourage that if you haven’t watched it already, you should take a few minutes and watch the Bible Project’s video on the book:

The Bible Project: Job, from the Wisdom series

Job is found in the Bible alongside Proverbs and Ecclesiastes as a part of the wisdom literature. It isn’t set in an identifiable time period, although it is explicitly set in a land that was not Israel (the land of Uz), and Job was ostensibly not an Israelite. Whether or not he actually existed is unknown, but the story of Job ties together the other two wisdom books in a way that Solomon’s wisdom could not: a man who walks in the way of the wise in Proverbs seems to be reaping instead the fruit of the way of the foolish, prompting him to begin to experience the frustration and cynicism of Ecclesiastes as he pours out his deep pain to his friends.

What is more remarkable is the fact that we see clearly that God has, in fact, allowed his suffering! There is no room for debating the control God may or may not possess over evil in this narrative. We see God on the throne, allowing the enemy latitude to attack a man who God regards as a faithful and beloved servant. The question is: why? We tend to view suffering of this sort, if God is involved at all, as something that is targeted at the deserving. Surely Job is who God says he is: a faithful servant who walks in His ways joyfully.

Refining fires

Without spoiling too much of what is to come as we get further into the book, I want to set the theme for everything by pointing far past it deep into the words of Paul to the Romans: “All things work together for good for those who love God, and are called according to His purpose.” This sentence is a load-bearing beam in the house that is the truth of Christ we call our home, if one is truly a believer. It is not my design today to answer all the questions I have set out about Job, but rather to lay them out before you. I would propose that we all spend time considering them in light of our current experiences, and lay upon them the truth of Romans 8:28.

This is not light work, but neither is it dreary and joyless. On the contrary: when suffering comes, when the enemy has been loosed to wreak havoc, we as believers must take heart in two key truths. First, as Charles Spurgeon noted, the enemy is on a leash. The Lord may give him latitude but every blow he strikes will fall short of its mark, and in fact will serve the devil’s opposite purpose: it will sharpen and refine you, as the Lord brings before your eyes the idols you may have been clinging to until this time. Let them go and let them burn, and rejoice that God has not let you keep them.

Secondly, in the end we will see His purpose and know His glory in ways we cannot fathom now. Just as Jesus went to the cross for the joy that was set before Him and in full disregard for any earthly shame that hung on such a death, so those of us who follow after Him endure our own particular sufferings in faith that He is so much more beautiful and valuable than anything here on earth, and so much more worthy of our worship.

I hope that this series will be an encouragement to my listeners, and be sure to follow along with the Scripture Sunday podcasts as we continue to walk through the text of the book itself. Those of you who are engaged in hardship, I would invite you to reach out for prayer, whether in the comments below or through email.

Support and notes

I wanted to let everyone know that we are now on Instagram and YouTube! If you have been edified by our work here, please consider following and subscribing, and sharing our podcasts with friends and family. My and Jarod’s desire is to see the gospel of Jesus Christ spread throughout the world and His name glorified as Savior and King, and we can’t do that without your support.

In addition, if you would like to help us build out our work here, please consider becoming a supporter of ours on Patreon. Three dollars as month is all it takes, but I caution as always not to give if it will impact your ability to support your local church.

Scripture Sunday: Job 7 thru 9

Listen here or subscribe on your favorite podcast app

We are continuing through the book of Job, as we see Job’s lament and frustration with his suffering rising. His friends continue to insist that he must have sinned in a way to anger God and bring evil on himself, yet Job insists that’s not the case.

Have you experienced this in your own life? How have you worked through it? Please leave comments or feel free to email and we will pray for and encourage you. As we continue through Job both here and on Spurgeon Audio, we will try our best to wrestle through this question we all wrestle with: why do bad things happen to those who don’t seem to deserve any of it?

If you like this translation you can purchase your own CSB Spurgeon study bible.

Please consider joining our Patreon.

Scripture Sunday – Job 4 thru 6

Listen here or subscribe in your favorite podcast app

We are continuing through the book of Job, in preparation for the next Spurgeon Audio series in the same book. Job’s friends are beginning to try to help him reason out why he has been suffering, saying that he surely must have done something against God. Job in turn expresses frustration and confusion because he would love to accept God’s correction – if he knew what he did!

This book is a picture of the difficult balance between understanding how God can be sovereign and good, and why evil seems to continue so successfully in our world. This is not a simple or easy question, or one that can be brushed off, and we ought to wrestle with it just as deeply. Listen along and please consider supporting our podcast on Patreon.

Scripture Sunday – Job 1 thru 3

Listen here or on your favorite podcast app

We are getting Scripture Sunday restarted! Every Sunday afternoon there will be livestreamed Scripture reading on the Kings Way Talk Facebook page, and I will repost it here afterwards on the podcast feed.

Since the upcoming Spurgeon Audio series will be out of the book of Job, we are going to spend the next few weeks going through that book as well. I hope you will join me in reading and praying through this challenging text as we get ready for the upcoming sermon series as well.

If you like the version I’m reading from, you can buy your own copy of the Spurgeon CSB study Bible.